Coco Drawing




AUGUSTE RENOIR
Coco at Drawing, 1904




 

Renoir saw himself in the friendliest agreement with the world which is why he remained in touch with the nature of the children. One likeable example is the portrait of his youngest son Claude. In his late years, Renoir had finger-crippling gout problems which led him to move to the south of France although this did not help much.

Here, this little piece was created, showing the youngest son who often watched his father work and for whom drawing was a form of creation requiring much dedication and a serious mind. The pencil is very sharp and light at the end, but in itself, it is quite bulky and it is prone to its own movements which you can only control by being most closely to it. The head has come down, with the hair touching the arm, and the lips tell us that something intricate should come into existence ...

Only very few portraits succeeded in sensitively reflecting the being of a child who is so much in natural harmony with himself. Everything is a process of becoming something, as well as a perfect unity with the light feeling of the body and with the devotion in which the self is lost ...